Luisa Rosti

 

 

 

                                 ENGLISH                                                                    ITALIANO

                              CURRICULUM                                                         CURRICULUM

                           AUTOBIOGRAPHY                                                 AUTOBIOGRAFIA

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


 

 

Luisa Rosti                     

Full Professor of Economic Policy

University of Pavia

Dept. of Economics and Management

Via San Felice, 5, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)

e-mail: lrosti@eco.unipv.it

 

My Google Scholar profile
 

VQR average scores 2004-2010:

My average score: 0,93.

GEV13 = 0,32; SUB GEV13 (Economics) = 0,42; SECS-P/02 = 0,40.

http://www.anvur.org/rapporto/files/Area13/VQR2004-2010_Area13_Tabelle.pdf

My average score 2007-2013 (self-estimated under 2004-2010 rules): the same (sure) or better (perhaps)

 


 

 


 

Curriculum vitae

1947: Born in Vigevano (PV), Italy

1971: Degree in Economics - University of Pavia

1972-1974: Research Assistant, Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia

1975-1980: Senior Researcher, Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia

1981-2005: Lecturer, Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia

2006: Associate Professor, Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia

2007- Present: Full Professor, Department of Economics and Management, University of Pavia.

 

Current Teaching

 

·         Labor Economics (Economia del lavoro) (2002- present)

·         Personnel and Gender  Economics (Economia del personale e di genere)

 

 

 

Previous Teaching

 

Personnel Economics - Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia (2002/03 - 2012/13).

Gender Economics - Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia (2002/03 - 2012/2013).

Information Economics – Interfaculty course of Communication, University of Pavia (2004/05 - 2009/10).

Political Economy (A-K) - Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia (2007/08 - 2009/10).

Industrial Economics - Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia (1992/93 - 1997/98).

Industrial Organization - Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Pavia (2001/02 - 2003/04).

Labor Economics - Faculty of Political Science, University of Piemonte Orientale (2001/02 - 2003/04).

Principles of Political Economy - Faculty of Political Science, University of Piemonte Orientale (2000/01).

Political Economy I - Faculty of Economics, University of Pavia (1991/92).

Economic geography and food policies - Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Pavia (2001/02)

 

 

 

 

 

Research Interests

Gender Studies, Labor Economics, Personnel Economics, Education, Self-employment

 

 

Scientific Societies and Networks:

 

Centre for Research on Gender Studies - University of Pavia

Strategic Committee Woman-family-work - Regione Lombardia

UNIRES (Italian Centre for Research on Universities and Higher Education Systems)

CIRSIS (Centre for Study and Research on Higher Education Systems).

AIEL (Italian Association of Labour Economists) - Member of the Executive (1993 – 1997)

Network: Changing Labour Markets, Welfare Policies, and Citizenship (COST ACTION 13)

Network: Youth Unemployment and Social Exclusion in Europe (TSER area 111).

 

REFEREE: Gender & Society, AIS Journal of Sociology, Economics Bulletin, Labour, European Union Review, Time & Society, Thomson Learning Publishers, Economia & Lavoro, Lavoro e Relazioni Industriali, Economia Politica, Rivista Italiana degli Economisti.

 

 

Selected Publications:

 

- “Unfair tournaments: gender stereotyping and wage discrimination among Italian graduates”, Gender & Society, forthcoming (with C. Castagnetti). Impact Factor: 2.414 (Ranked: 1 out of 38 in Women's Studies)

- “Shortening university career fades the signal away. Evidence from Italy” Applied Economics Research Bulletin (forthcoming) (with C. Castagnetti and S. Dal Bianco).

- “Higher education in non-standard wage contracts”, Education + Training, 2012, 54, 2-3, (con F. Chelli).

- “Who skims the cream of the Italian graduate crop? Wage employment versus self-employment”, Small Business Economics, 2011, 36, 2, 223-234 (with C. Castagnetti).

- “The gender gap in academic achievements of Italian graduates”, in Samuel A. Davies (ed.) “Gender Gap: Causes, Experiences and Effects” Nova Science Publishers, Inc., NY, 2010 (with C. Castagnetti).

- “Self-employment among Italian female graduates”, Education + Training 2009, 51, 7, 526-540 (with F. Chelli).

- “Effort allocation in tournaments: the effect of gender on Italian graduate performance”, Economics of Education Review, 2009, 28, 3, 357-369 (with C. Castagnetti).

- “Educational Performance as Signalling Device: Evidence from Italy”, Economics Bulletin, 2005, 9, 4, 1-7, (with C. Castagnetti and F. Chelli).

- “Gender Discrimination, Entrepreneurial Talent and Self-Employment in Italy” Small Business Economics, 2005, 24, 2, 131-142 (with F. Chelli).

 

Autobiography:

 


 


 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

I am not a protagonist of contemporary economic thought. My contribution to disciplinary knowledge has been focused entirely (or almost) on development of the following thesis:

 

If one assumes the hypothesis of the equal distribution of talent (or innate ability) between men and women, and if one observes the empirical regularity constituted by the fact that women have been and are socially, politically and economically inferior to men, one draws the conclusion that the current institutional system – the set of rules that control and distribute resources – is inefficient and can be changed in a manner that is both favorable to women and more advantageous to society as a whole.

 

I have shared this conviction and the subject-matter of my research with all those who concern themselves with gender studies. But the distinctive feature of my contribution (if any) is that its method lies wholly within the mainstream. My work, in fact, has usually argued against the conclusions of dominant economic theory but in doing so has used that theory’s methodological apparatus. This is not as extravagant as it may seem. If it is true that “economics is the only disciplinary area in which two individuals can win the Nobel prize by arguing exactly the opposite to each other”, from my point of view the only problem is that still today the mainstream is unaware of me.

The feature shared by mainstream economists (apart from the fact that they do not know who I am) is their faith in the three methodological pillars of dominant economic theory: the hypothesis that agents behave rationally; the concept of equilibrium; and the normative objective of Pareto efficiency. This core of this approach is expressed in the following statement:

 

If rational individuals are left to bargain and to compete against each other, not only will they exchange goods and services efficiently (i.e. in a manner which maximizes their individual welfare) but they will also create efficient social institutions (i.e. ones which maximize collective welfare).

 

 


 

 

The origins

 

My studies on ‘women and work’ were not originally addressed to economists and they raised no challenge against mainstream economic theory. They were instead intended for the seminars and conferences organized by women and for women which proliferated before, during and after enactment of law 125 of 1991 (“Positive Actions for Equality between Men and Women in Work”).

A typical feature of these conferences was that they gave priority to an interdisciplinary approach to the theme. And paradoxically it was precisely this approach that directed my research towards mainstream economic thought. Here by ‘interdisciplinary approach’ I mean simply that these meetings were usually attended by an economist, a jurist, a sociologist, a psychologist, a statistician or a demographer, sometimes a philosopher, on occasion a theologist, and so on.

In my early papers as an economist I accordingly endeavoured to apply the interdisciplinary approach. I would present some data on the labour market (activity, employment and unemployment rates disaggregated by sex) and then subject them to interpretations both economic and (as the case might be) sociological, legal, psychological, demographic, and so on. But this never worked well: the other speakers would tell me more or less politely: ‘No, no, just stick to economics!’.

So to confine myself to economics I tried a variety of alternatives: the (American) radical approach, the Marxian one, segmentation theory, all of them more problematic and critical than the mainstream theory. But these attempts too were unsuccessful. The reaction of the other speakers was still cool; but how could they appreciate the criticisms if they knew nothing of mainstream theory?

At that point I plucked up my courage and threw myself into the mainstream, claiming for myself the role that Arrow saw himself as fulfilling, ironically I presume:

 

“I want to discuss here the relation between society and the individual in, I would like to say a rational spirit, but let me be more particular, in the spirit of an economist. An economist by training thinks of himself as the guardian of rationality, the ascriber of rationality to others, and the prescriber of rationality to the social world. It is this role that I will play”. (Arrow 1974, p. 16).

 

I soon felt myself an authority, for I had an instrument – economic method – which I could use to give a rational frame to any problem of choice, whether individual or social.

I could let myself be guided in economic policy matters by what Harsanyi calls ‘the ambition of reason’ or the general principle that individual and collective decisions become arguments of a single general theory of rational behaviour (Harsanyi 1994, p. XIII).

I felt myself entirely fulfilled as I pursued the goal well expressed by Stigler:

 

“We wish to be scientists, with sound logic in our theories ... [but] ...We wish also to be important ... we wish to do good – much good, and generally recognized as such”. (Stigler 1976, p. 353).

 

As a mainstream economist I thus finally found myself able to do good. I could, that is to say, issue prescriptions which even those who wanted to have nothing to do with women would find difficult to oppose. As Carlo Maria Cipolla stresses, in fact, only a fool would oppose a Pareto improvement.

 

“A fool is someone who harms another person or group of persons without obtaining any advantage thereby or even suffering a loss … The fool is the most dangerous type of person that exists … Day after day, with unceasing monotony, one is hampered and thwarted by stubbornly stupid people who unexpectedly intrude in the most inconvenient places and at the most awkward times … people that one previously thought rational and intelligent suddenly prove to be unequivocally and irremediably stupid“. (Cipolla 1988, p. 46).

 

Fascinated by this immediate normative power I was left unaffected by Simon’s irony when he wrote (1978, p. 2).

 

“Economics, whether normative or positive, has not simply been the study of the allocation of scarce resources, it has been the study of the ‘rational’ allocation of scarce resources ... As is well known, the rational man of economics is a maximizer, who will settle for nothing less than the best. Even his expectations ... are rational ...And his rationality extends as far as the bedroom for, as Gary Becker tell us, ‘he would read in bed at night only if the value of reading exceeded the value (to him) of the loss in sleep suffered by his wife’ (1974, p. 1078)”.

 

But the irony that I once liked so much now strikes me as futile and misplaced if set against the normative power of the mainstream. And it also strikes me as rash to accept the invitations (very friendly but poorly argued) to abandon a methodological approach which I see as working only to the advantage of women.

Irony upon irony, I now prefer Stigler’s view of the matter:

 

“The thesis that flows naturally and even irresistibly from the theory of economics is as follows: “Man is eternally a utility-maximizer, in his home, in his office – be it public or private -, in his church, in his scientific work, in short, everywhere. He can and often errs: perhaps the calculation is too difficult but more often his information is incomplete. He learns to correct these errors, although sometimes at heavy cost.

What we call ethics, on this approach, is a set of rules with respect to dealings with other persons, rules which in general prohibit behavior ... which imposes large costs on others with small gains to oneself. General observance of these rules makes not only for long term gains to the actor but also yields ... to achieve the general benefits.

... This include such popular contemporary policies as ...prohibition of the use of characteristics such as race and age and sex in certain areas of behavior (but not yet in other areas such as marriage” (Stigler 1980, p. 15-16)

 

The results

 

Many of my studies have a feature in common: they raise a challenge, prompted by psychological resistance, against outright acceptance of the implications of certain significant findings of mainstream economic theory (or better, perhaps, against some hackneyed version of them).

It was this that prompted my essay on discrimination Femina Œconomica (1996). The story that I had been told ran more or less as follows: ‘Discrimination is unfair and it is a problem for you women who suffer it. You are therefore right, you women, to demand that discrimination should be prohibited by law’. In this case my psychological resistance was provoked by the assertion ‘it is a problem for you women’, which I thought was misleading and obscured the crux of the question, namely that discrimination is a problem for the economy because it is due to the rational behavior of agents, it persists in a competitive labor market, and it gives rise to an inefficient allocation of resources. What struck me as really crucial was the inefficiency of the allocative result, not its unfairness, and it was for this reason that I tried to represent the anti-discrimination rules as bringing a Pareto improvement – that is, a benefit not only for women but for the whole of society.

My essay Se sei così brava, perché non sei ricca? (2007) challenged the conclusions of Becker’s Treatise on the Family (1991). Becker used an extension of the rational choice model to show that the current division of family role, with the woman assuming responsibility for domestic production and men engaging in production for the market, maximizes both individual and collective welfare. My psychological resistance was caused by the alleged optimality of this division of gender labor, and by the consequent social cost of a fairer division of domestic and care work.

I protested that Becker’s proof dealt with the optimal allocation of the personal resources of time and effort, but it ignored the problem of the optimal allocation of people’s talent. In my view, either one explicitly assumes that women have a natural talent only and exclusively for domestic work, or one must simultaneously address the problem of the optimal allocation of their innate ability. I argued that in internal labor markets the career path takes the form of a hierarchical scale, where only those who rise above the first levels have any chance of reaching the top. If  women remain outside the labor market during the initial phases of the competition, they will never be able to reach the top positions that reveal their talents. From this I drew the conclusion that a more equal division of domestic and care work, encouraged by appropriate economic policy measures, would increase the likelihood that women will be matched with professional positions which allow their talent to emerge. And this would make the allocation individually and socially optimal.

The final example of reaction to a challenge, this time implicit in the topic itself, is my essay on female entrepreneurship (2005). On analyzing the dynamic of female self-employment I observed a stable trend of very low participation which at first sight seemingly conflicted with the predictions of discrimination theory. The question that I frequently heard asked in commentary on the data was the following: ‘But if you women feel that you’re so discriminated against by employers, why don’t you set up on you own? That way no one can discriminate against you, and you can show us how good you are!

I took up the challenge and argued that, paradoxically, it may be precisely discrimination that explains the low level of self-employment among women. Discrimination, in fact, distorts the distribution of entrepreneurial ability between dependent employees and self-employed workers because even less talented women set up on their own in order to avoid discrimination by employers. As a consequence, self-employed female workers are less likely to survive than male ones, because their lesser ability increases their risk of failure. Flow data bear out this explanation, showing that women are not reluctant to set up as entrepreneurs but fail to remain in business, and that exits from self-employment are of an equal intensity as entries.

The last example of the reaction to a challenge, in this case also implicit in the argument itself, is the theory of Tournaments investigated in a gender perspective (2009 EER, 2013). “In tournaments women are just the prize?”

In the contemporary economic literature, the theory of tournaments attaches to competition for career property of efficiency in the revelation of talent, but stresses that this attractive feature of the model is true if and only if the tournaments are symmetrical, i.e. if all agents pay the same cost to participate in the competition (otherwise the tournament is uneven), and if none of the participants is discriminated against by the rules of the game (otherwise the tournament is unfair).

The data on the distribution of employees by sex and hierarchical level, however, show that the competitions for a career in the real world are not symmetrical. Gender stereotypes affect negatively on the agents’ choices from both the supply side and the demand side of the labor market. On the supply side, that is, the decisions made by individuals, the effects of the stereotype that delegates to women only the responsibility of domestic work and care make the comparison between the sexes an unequal struggle, and favor the persistence of gender differences in hiring, promotion and compensation. On the demand side, that is, the decisions taken by entrepreneurs, a substantial literature shows that, because of the stereotypes, an identical performance is systematically underestimated if attributed to a woman rather than a man, thus revealing the existence of gender discrimination and hindering the detection of female talent.

The low presence of women in top management positions resulting from these stereotyped choices represents a cost to society: the cost due to the failure to use half of the potential intelligence of the productive system, so the resolution of this problem is not only a particular interest in women, but also and above all a general interest of the society.

That is because the most talented individuals make fewer mistakes. As the mistakes made at top levels cause the most serious consequences because they affect the underlying layers, organizations should draw career paths that lead to the summit the most talented individuals.

The low presence of women in top positions is a problem that does not resolve itself, over time. The elimination of prejudices is in fact hampered by the mechanism of self-fulfilling forecasts, for which stereotypes are transformed into prophecies that are in themselves their own fulfillment.

The equal opportunity policies will therefore be necessary as long as the career paths will not produce a representation of women in top positions that reflects the equal distribution of intelligence between the sexes in the society; until then, every top position vacated by a talented woman will be occupied by a man less able to her, and this result is individually unfair (from the point of view of women) and socially inefficient (from the point of view of the community).

 

 

Bibliographical References

 

Arrow K.J. (1974), The Limits of Organization, New York, W.W. Norton & Company.

Cipolla C.M. (1988) Allegro ma non troppo, Il Mulino, Bologna.

Harsanyi J.C. (1974) L’utilitarismo, Il Saggiatore, Milano, second ed., 1994, p. XIII

Rosti L. (1996) Femina Œconomica, Ediesse, Roma, 115.

Rosti L. (2007) Se sei così brava, perché non sei ricca? in ISFOL (a cura di) Esiste un differenziale retributivo di genere in Italia?, Power&Gender, Roma, 91-112.

Rosti L. (2009) Effort allocation in tournaments: the effect of gender on Italian graduate performance, Economics of Education Review, 28, 3, 357-369 (with C. Castagnetti).

Rosti L. (2013) Unfair tournaments: gender stereotyping and wage discrimination among Italian graduates, Gender & Society, forthcoming (with C. Castagnetti).

Simon H.A. (1978) Rationality as Process and as Product of Thought, American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, 68, 1-16.

Stigler G.J. (1976) Do Economists Matter? Southern Economic Journal, 42, 3, 347-354.

Stigler G.J. (1980) The Ethics of Competition: The Unfriendly Critics, University of Chicago, George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State, W. P. 13.

 

 

 


 


 

 

 


 

 

 

Luisa Rosti                     

Professore ordinario di Politica economica

Università di Pavia

Dip.to di Scienze Economiche e Aziendali

Via San Felice, 5, 27100 Pavia

e-mail: lrosti@eco.unipv.it

 

Il mio profiloGoogle Scholar
 

VQR average scores 2004-2010:

My average score: 0,93.

GEV13 = 0,32; SUB GEV13 (Economics) = 0,42; SECS-P/02 = 0,40.

http://www.anvur.org/rapporto/files/Area13/VQR2004-2010_Area13_Tabelle.pdf

My average score 2007-2013 (self-estimated under 2004-2010 rules): the same (sure) or better (perhaps)

 

 


Curriculum vitae

1947: Nata a Vigevano (PV)

1971: Laurea in Economia – Università di Pavia

1972-1974: Borsista - Facoltà di Economia – Università di Pavia

1975-1980: Contrattista - Facoltà di Economia – Università di Pavia

1981-2005: Ricercatrice confermata – Facoltà di Economia – Università di Pavia

4/03/2003 - Idoneità a Professore Associato SECS-P/02 (Politica Economica) conseguita presso la Scuola Sup. di Studi Univ. e Perfezionamento S.Anna di Pisa.

16/11/04 Idoneità a Professore Ordinario SECS-P/02 (Politica Economica) conseguita presso la Facoltà di Scienze Manageriali dell’Università di Chieti-Pescara.

Dal 1/01/05 al 1/11/07 - Professore di ruolo di seconda fascia SECS-P/02 - Università di Pavia

Dal 1/11/07 - Professore ordinario - SECS-P/02 (Politica economica) - Università di Pavia

 

Insegnamenti A.A. 2013/14

·         Economia del lavoro 9 e 6 cfu (dal 2002 ad oggi)

·         Economia del personale e di genere 6 cfu

 

 

Insegnamenti precedenti

 

Economia del lavoro (istituzioni) - Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (2002/03 - 2010/11).

Economia del lavoro (base) - Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (2002/03 - 2010/11).

Economia del personale - Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (2002/03 - 2012/13).

Economia di genere - Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (2002/03 - 2012/2013).

Economia dell’informazione e della comunicazione nel corso inter-facoltà di Comunicazione Interculturale e Multimediale (2004/05 - 2009/10).

Economia Politica istituzioni (A-K) Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (2007/08 - 2009/10).

Economia Industriale - Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (1992/93 - 1997/98).

Organizzazione aziendale - Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia -Università di Pavia (2001/02 - 2003/04).

Economia del lavoro - Facoltà di Scienze Politiche - Università del Piemonte Orientale (2001/02 - 2003/04).

Istituzioni di economia politica - Facoltà di Scienze Politiche - Università del Piemonte Orientale (2000/01).

Economia Politica I - Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (1991/92).

Geografia economica e politiche alimentari - Diploma di Dietista - Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia -Università di Pavia (2001/02)

Esercitazioni di Microeconomia - Facoltà di Economia - Università di Pavia (1998/99 - 2001/02).

 

ATTIVITA' SCIENTIFICA

L'attività scientifica é prevalentemente attinente all'economia di genere, economia del personale, economia dell’istruzione e occupazione indipendente. Una pubblicazione rappresentativa di questi interessi di ricerca è ad esempio“Femina Œconomica”, Ediesse, Roma, 1996.

 

PUBBLICAZIONI RECENTI

- Unfair tournaments: gender stereotyping and wage discrimination among Italian graduates, Gender & Society, forthcoming (with C. Castagnetti). Impact Factor: 2.414 (Ranked: 1 out of 38 in Women's Studies)

- “Shortening university career fades the signal away. Evidence from Italy” Applied Economics Research Bulletin (forthcoming) (con C. Castagnetti e S. Dal Bianco).

- “Higher education in non-standard wage contracts”, Education + Training, 2012, 54, 2-3, (con F. Chelli).

- “Who skims the cream of the Italian graduate crop? Wage employment versus self-employment”, Small Business Economics, 2011, 36, 2, 223-234 (con C. Castagnetti).

- “The gender gap in academic achievements of Italian graduates”, in Samuel A. Davies (ed.) “Gender Gap: Causes, Experiences and Effects” Nova Science Publishers, Inc., NY, 2010 (con C. Castagnetti).

- “Self-employment among Italian female graduates”, Education + Training, 2009, 51, 7, 526-540 (con F. Chelli).

- “Stereotipi di genere e imprenditorialità delle laureate” in Silvia Luraghi (a cura di) Il mondo alla rovescia. Il potere delle donne visto dagli uomini, Milano, Franco Angeli, 2009.

- “Effort allocation in tournaments: the effect of gender on Italian graduate performance”, Economics of Education Review, 2009, 28, 3, 357-369 (con C. Castagnetti).

- “Le laureate in Economia e la scelta tra lavoro in proprio e lavoro subordinato” Economia & Lavoro, 2008, 2, 101-119

- “Se sei così brava, perché non sei ricca? Differenze di genere nei rendimenti scolastici e nelle retribuzioni dei laureati” in ISFOL (a cura di) “Esiste un differenziale retributivo di genere in Italia?”, Power&Gender, Roma, 2007.

- “Educational Performance as Signalling Device: Evidence from Italy”, Economics Bulletin, 2005, 9, 4, 1-7, (con C. Castagnetti e F. Chelli).

- “Gender Discrimination, Entrepreneurial Talent and Self-Employment in Italy” Small Business Economics, 2005, 24, 2, 131-142 (con F. Chelli).

 

ASSOCIAZIONI SCIENTIFICHE e NETWORK:

Centro di Ricerca sugli Studi di Genere dell’Università di Pavia

Comitato Strategico Donna-famiglia-lavoro della Regione Lombardia

UNIRES (Italian Centre for Research on Universities and Higher Education Systems)

CIRSIS (Centro Interdipartimentale di Studi e Ricerche sui Sistemi di Istruzione Superiore).

Direttivo nazionale dell’AIEL (Associazione Italiana degli Economisti del Lavoro) dal 1993 al 1997

Network: Changing Labour Markets, Welfare Policies, and Citizenship (COST ACTION 13)

Network: Youth Unemployment and Social Exclusion in Europe (TSER area 111).

 

REFEREE:

 

Gender & Society, AIS Journal of Sociology, Economics Bulletin, Labour, European Union Review, Time & Society, Thomson Learning Publishers, Economia & Lavoro, Lavoro e Relazioni Industriali, Economia Politica, Rivista Italiana degli Economisti.


 Autobiografia

 

                                                                                              

 

 

Introduzione

 

Non sono una protagonista, nella storia del pensiero economico contemporaneo; il focus del mio personale contributo al sapere disciplinare sta tutto (o quasi) nell'aver un po' argomentato l'affermazione seguente:

 

Se si assume l’ipotesi di uguale distribuzione di talento (o abilità innata) tra uomini e donne come gruppo, e si osserva la regolarità empirica costituita dal fatto che le donne come gruppo sono state e sono in posizione inferiore socialmente, politicamente ed economicamente rispetto agli uomini come gruppo, se ne trae la conclusione che l’attuale assetto istituzionale, cioè l’insieme delle regole che determinano il controllo e la distribuzione delle risorse, è inefficiente, e può essere cambiato in modo al tempo stesso più favorevole alle donne e più vantaggioso per l’intera società.

Ho condiviso questa convinzione, e l'oggetto delle mie ricerche, con chiunque si sia occupato di gender studies, ma la peculiarità del mio contributo (if any) sta nel metodo, che è tutto interno al mainstream. Il mio lavoro, infatti, è solitamente volto ad argomentare in senso contrario alle conclusioni della teoria economica dominante, pur restando nell’ambito dello stesso apparato metodologico. Ciò può non essere così stravagante come appare, se è vero che “l’economia è il solo ambito disciplinare in cui due individui possono ottenere il premio Nobel per aver sostenuto uno l’esatto contrario dell’altro”; dal mio punto di vista, l'unico problema sta nel fatto che a tutt'oggi il mainstream mi ignora.

Gli economisti mainstream hanno in comune (oltre al fatto di ignorarmi) la fiducia nei tre capisaldi su cui si fonda l'apparato metodologico della teoria economica dominante: l’ipotesi comportamento razionale degli agenti, la rilevanza del concetto di equilibrio, e l’obiettivo normativo dell’efficienza paretiana. Il cuore di questo approccio sta nell’affermazione seguente:

 

Se individui razionali sono lasciati liberi di contrattare e di competere tra loro, non solo si scambiano beni e servizi in modo efficiente (cioè in modo da massimizzare il proprio benessere individuale), ma creano anche istituzioni sociali efficienti (cioè tali da massimizzare il benessere collettivo).

 

Le origini

 

Le mie considerazioni sul tema "donne e lavoro" non erano in origine destinate agli economisti, e non contenevano alcuna sfida alla teoria economica dominante. Le mie considerazioni erano solitamente destinate a quei seminari e convegni, organizzati dalle donne e rivolti alle donne, che sono fioriti numerosi prima, durante, e dopo la promulgazione della legge 125 del 1991 (Azioni positive per la realizzazione della parità tra uomo e donna nel lavoro).

Una caratteristica tipica di questi convegni è sempre stata quella di privilegiare l'approccio interdisciplinare al tema; e, paradossalmente, proprio questo approccio interdisciplinare è risultato determinante nell'indirizzare la mia ricerca verso il pensiero economico mainstream. Per approccio interdisciplinare intendo qui banalmente il fatto che a questi incontri partecipavano di solito: una economista, una giurista, una sociologa, una psicologa, una statistica o una demografa, a volte una filosofa, qualche volta una teologa, e così via.

Nei miei primi interventi da economista mi sforzavo di essere in armonia con l'approccio interdisciplinare: presentavo alcuni dati sul mercato del lavoro (tassi di attività, di occupazione, di disoccupazione disaggregati per sesso) a cui sovrapponevo interpretazioni un po' economiche ma anche (a seconda dei casi) un po' sociologiche, giuridiche, psicologiche, demografiche, ecc.

Ma non andava mai proprio bene: le altre relatrici, più o meno direttamente, mi dicevano: ma no, ma no, tu fai l'economista e basta!

Per restare nel campo economico ho sperimentato allora: l'approccio femminista (americano), quello radicale, quello marxiano e quello della segmentazione, tutti più problematici del mainstream e critici nei confronti della teoria dominante, ma non andava mai proprio bene; le ascoltatrici restavano fredde: come potevano apprezzare le critiche se non conoscevano la teoria dominante?

Allora ho preso il coraggio a due mani e mi sono buttata nel mainstream rivendicando per me, senza ritegno, il ruolo che Arrow attribuisce a sé stesso, credo con ironia:

 

"Voglio discutere ... la relazione tra società e individuo con spirito razionale, ... o, per essere più preciso, con spirito da economista. Un economista, per sua formazione, pensa a sé stesso come al guardiano della razionalità, a colui che attribuisce razionalità agli altri e che prescrive razionalità al mondo sociale. E' questo il ruolo che io intendo svolgere" (Arrow 1974, p. 16).

Mi sono subito sentita autorevole: possedevo infatti uno strumento - il metodo dell'economia - che consente di impostare razionalmente qualsiasi problema di scelta, sia individuale che sociale.

Potevo farmi guidare, nelle prescrizioni di politica economica, da quella che Harsanyi chiama l'ambizione della ragione, ovvero il principio generale per il quale le decisioni individuali e quelle collettive diventano argomenti di un'unica teoria generale del comportamento razionale. (Harsanyi 1994, p. XIII)

Mi sono sentita anche pienamente realizzata: la mia aspirazione può essere infatti ben espressa dalle parole di Stigler, che scrive:

 

"Noi vogliamo essere scienziati, con rigore logico nelle nostre teorie ... [ma] ... desideriamo anche essere importanti ... desideriamo fare del bene (molto bene) e che sia generalmente riconosciuto come tale" (Stigler 1994, p. 442)

Come economista mainstream ero dunque finalmente capace di fare del bene, cioè ero in grado di fare prescrizioni difficili da contrastare, anche da parte di coloro che proprio di donne non ne vorrebbero neanche sentir parlare. Come sottolinea Carlo Maria Cipolla, infatti, solo uno stupido può opporsi ad un miglioramento paretiano.

 

"Una persona stupida è una persona che causa un danno ad un'altra persona o gruppo di persone senza nel contempo realizzare alcun vantaggio per sé o addirittura subendo una perdita … La persona stupida è il tipo di persona più pericoloso che esista … Giorno dopo giorno, con un'incessante monotonia, si è intralciati e ostacolati nella propria attività da individui pervicacemente stupidi, che compaiono improvvisamente ed inaspettatamente nei luoghi e nei momenti meno opportuni … persone che uno ha giudicato in passato razionali ed intelligenti si rivelano poi all'improvviso inequivocabilmente e irrimediabilmente stupide" (Cipolla 1988, p. 46).

Affascinata da questo immediato potere normativo, non mi sono sentita più neppure sfiorata dall'ironia di Simon (1978, p. 2), che scrive:

 

"L'economia, sia normativa che positiva, non é stata semplicemente lo studio dell'allocazione di risorse scarse, é stata lo studio della allocazione razionale delle risorse scarse ... Come é ben noto, l'individuo razionale dell'economia é un massimizzatore, che non decide nulla che non sia il meglio. Persino le sue aspettative sono razionali...e la sua razionalità si estende fino alla camera da letto, dal momento che , come ci dice Gary Becker, ‘egli leggerà a letto, la sera, solo se il valore del leggere supererà, per lui, il valore della perdita di sonno sofferta da sua moglie’ (1974, p. 1078)".

Questa ironia, che a primo impatto mi era piaciuta, mi sembra adesso futile e dispersiva, se posta in alternativa al rilevante potere normativo del mainstream, e mi sembra anche improvvido accogliere gli inviti (molto amichevoli ma poco argomentati) a separarmi da un approccio metodologico di cui vedo ormai solo il vantaggio per le donne.

 

Ironia per ironia, preferisco ora quella di Stigler, che scrive:

 

Dalla teoria economica discende in modo naturale e irresistibile quanto segue: "L'uomo massimizzerà la sua utilità in eterno, in casa, in ufficio - sia esso privato o pubblico - in chiesa, nel lavoro scientifico, in breve ovunque. Egli può compiere, anzi compie di frequente, degli errori: il calcolo può risultare troppo complesso, ma più spesso è la sua informazione ad essere incompleta. Egli impara a correggere questi errori, sebbene ciò comporti qualche volta dei costi elevati. Quella che chiamiamo morale, in questo senso, è un insieme di regole che riguardano le relazioni con gli altri individui, regole che in generale impediscono all'individuo di ... imporre costi elevati sugli altri per ottenere ... piccoli guadagni per sé. L'osservanza generale di queste regole ... permette di raggiungere dei benefici per tutti". In questo ambito è inclusa "quella politica attualmente così popolare ... della proibizione dell'uso di certi elementi come la razza, l'età ed il sesso in alcune aree del comportamento (ma non ancora in altre aree come il matrimonio)" (Stigler 1994, p. 346).

 


 

I risultati

 

Molti dei miei lavori hanno una caratteristica in comune: nascono dalla percezione di un elemento di sfida, da un punto di resistenza psicologica che si frappone all'accoglimento tout court delle implicazioni di qualche risultato rilevante della teoria economica dominante (o forse, meglio, di qualche luogo comune della sua vulgata).

Così è nato, ad esempio, il saggio sulla discriminazione (Femina Œconomica). La storia abituale che mi sentivo raccontare era più o meno di questo tipo: la discriminazione è ingiusta, ed è un problema per voi donne che ne subite i danni; quindi fate bene, voi donne, a chiedere che la discriminazione sia vietata per legge. Ecco, in questo caso la resistenza psicologica è nata proprio da quel "è un problema per voi donne", che a mio avviso è fuorviante ed oscura l'aspetto essenziale della questione; l'aspetto essenziale della questione è che la discriminazione "è un problema per l'economia", perché discende dal comportamento razionale degli agenti, permane in un mercato del lavoro competitivo, e produce un'allocazione inefficiente delle risorse. Ciò che a me sembra realmente cruciale è l'inefficienza del risultato allocativo, non la sua iniquità, ed è per questo che ho cercato di rappresentare le regole antidiscriminatorie come portatrici di un miglioramento paretiano, cioè di un benessere che non vale solo per le donne ma per tutti.

 

Anche nel saggio “Se sei così brava, perché non sei ricca?” (2007) vi è un elemento di sfida alle conclusioni del Trattato sulla famiglia di Becker (1991). Becker dimostra infatti, con una estensione del modello di scelta razionale, che l'attuale divisione familiare dei ruoli, con le donne che si fanno carico della produzione domestica e gli uomini che si occupano della produzione per il mercato, massimizza sia il benessere individuale che quello collettivo. La resistenza psicologica nasce dalla pretesa ottimalità di questa divisione del lavoro di genere, e dal conseguente costo sociale che deriverebbe da una scelta più favorevole alla condivisione delle responsabilità del lavoro domestico e di cura.

Ho protestato che la dimostrazione di Becker garantisce l’allocazione ottimale delle risorse personali di tempo e di impegno, ma non considera affatto il problema dell'allocazione ottimale del talento degli individui; a mio avviso, o si assume esplicitamente che le donne abbiano un talento naturale proprio per la produzione domestica, e solo per quella, oppure si deve affrontare contemporaneamente anche il problema dell'allocazione ottimale della loro abilità innata. Ho argomentato che nei mercati del lavoro interni il percorso di carriera è rappresentato come una scala gerarchica: solo chi sale i primi gradini può arrivare fino alla cima. Se le donne restano fuori dal mercato del lavoro nelle fasi iniziali della competizione, non potranno mai raggiungere quelle posizioni apicali che rivelano il talento individuale. Ne ho tratto la conclusione che una più equa ripartizione del lavoro domestico e di cura, incentivata da un opportuno provvedimento di politica economica, aumenterebbe la probabilità delle donne di essere abbinate alle posizioni professionali che permettono al talento di rivelarsi, rendendone l’allocazione individualmente e socialmente ottimale.

 

Un altro esempio di reazione ad una sfida, questa volta implicita nell'argomento stesso, è costituito dal saggio sull'imprenditorialità femminile (2005). Rappresentando la dinamica dell’occupazione femminile indipendente in Italia ho osservato un andamento stabile, ad un livello di partecipazione molto basso, che al primo impatto sembra in evidente contrasto con le previsioni della teoria della discriminazione. La domanda abituale che mi sentivo porre, a commento dei dati, era infatti più o meno la seguente: ma se voi donne vi sentite così tanto discriminate dai datori di lavoro, perché non vi mettete in proprio, così nessuno vi discrimina e ci fate vedere quanto siete brave!

Ho raccolto la sfida, ed ho sostenuto che paradossalmente proprio la discriminazione può rivelarsi una convincente spiegazione della scarsa presenza femminile nell'occupazione indipendente. Per effetto della discriminazione si distorce infatti la distribuzione dell'abilità imprenditoriale tra occupati dipendenti e indipendenti, poiché anche le donne meno dotate di talento si metteranno in proprio per eludere la discriminazione dei datori di lavoro. Di conseguenza, l'occupazione femminile indipendente avrà una probabilità di sopravvivenza minore di quella maschile, perché la minor abilità aggraverà per le donne il rischio di insuccesso. L’uso dei dati di flusso prova la fondatezza di questa interpretazione, e dimostra che le donne non si sottraggono alla sperimentazione di un'attività indipendente, ma non riescono a permanere nello stato, e alimentano le uscite con la stessa intensità con cui alimentano le entrate.

 

L'ultimo esempio di reazione ad una sfida, anche in questo caso implicita nell'argomento stesso, è la teoria dei Tornei letta con sguardo di genere (2009 EER, 2013). Nei tornei le donne sono solo il premio?

Nella letteratura economica contemporanea, la teoria dei tornei attribuisce alla competizione per la carriera la proprietà di efficienza nella rivelazione del talento, ma sottolinea che questa attraente caratteristica del modello vale se e solo se i tornei sono simmetrici, cioè se tutti gli agenti sostengono lo stesso costo per partecipare alla competizione (altrimenti il torneo è impari) e se nessuno dei partecipanti è discriminato dalle regole della gara (altrimenti il torneo è ingiusto).

La realtà che emerge dall’analisi dei dati sulla distribuzione dei dipendenti per sesso e livello gerarchico evidenzia però che le competizioni per la carriera nel mondo reale non sono simmetriche. Gli stereotipi di genere condizionano infatti negativamente le scelte degli agenti sia dal lato dell’offerta sia dal lato della domanda di lavoro. Dal lato dell’offerta di lavoro, cioè delle decisioni prese dagli individui, gli effetti dello stereotipo che delega alla sola componente femminile la responsabilità del lavoro domestico e di cura rendono il confronto tra i sessi una lotta impari, e favoriscono il permanere delle differenze di genere nelle assunzioni, nelle promozioni e nelle retribuzioni. Dal lato della domanda di lavoro, cioè delle decisioni prese dalle imprese, una letteratura ormai consistente evidenzia come, a causa degli stereotipi, un’identica performance sia sistematicamente sottovalutata se attribuita ad una donna invece che ad un uomo, palesando in tal modo l’esistenza della discriminazione di genere  ed ostacolando la rivelazione del talento femminile.

L’esigua presenza di donne in posizione dirigenziale che deriva da queste scelte stereotipate rappresenta un costo per la società: il costo del mancato utilizzo di metà della potenziale intelligenza di cui il sistema produttivo può disporre; pertanto, la risoluzione di questo problema non rappresenta soltanto un interesse particolare delle donne, ma anche e soprattutto un interesse generale della società. Gli individui più dotati di talento, infatti, commettono meno errori, e poiché gli errori commessi al vertice producono conseguenze più gravi perché si ripercuotono sui livelli sottostanti, la struttura organizzativa deve disegnare percorsi di carriera che portino al vertice gli individui più dotati di talento.

La sottorappresentazione femminile nelle posizioni apicali non è un problema che possa risolversi da solo, col passare del tempo; l’eliminazione dei pregiudizi è infatti ostacolata dal meccanismo delle previsioni auto-confermantisi, per il quale gli stereotipi si trasformano in profezie che trovano in se stesse il proprio adempimento. Le politiche di pari opportunità saranno dunque necessarie fino a quando le regole che governano i percorsi di carriera non produrranno una rappresentanza femminile nelle posizioni di vertice della società che rifletta la pari distribuzione di intelligenza tra i generi; fino ad allora, ogni posizione apicale lasciata libera da una donna di talento sarà occupata da un uomo meno capace di lei, e questo risultato è individualmente ingiusto (dal punto di vista delle donne) e socialmente inefficiente (dal punto di vista della collettività).

 

 


 

 

Riferimenti Bibliografici

 

Arrow K.J. (1974), The Limits of Organization, New York, W.W. Norton & Company.

Cipolla C.M. (1988) Allegro ma non troppo, Il Mulino, Bologna.

Harsanyi J.C. (1974) L’utilitarismo, Il Saggiatore, Milano, seconda ed., 1994, p. XIII

Rosti L. (1996) Femina Œconomica, Ediesse, Roma, 115.

Rosti L. (2007) Se sei così brava, perché non sei ricca? in ISFOL (a cura di) Esiste un differenziale retributivo di genere in Italia?, Power&Gender, Roma, 91-112.

Rosti L. (2009) Effort allocation in tournaments: the effect of gender on Italian graduate performance, Economics of Education Review, 28, 3, 357-369 (con C. Castagnetti).

Rosti L. (2013) Unfair tournaments: gender stereotyping and wage discrimination among Italian graduates, Gender & Society, forthcoming (con C. Castagnetti).

Simon H.A. (1978) Rationality as Process and as Product of Thought, American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, 68, 1-16.

Stigler G.J. (1994) Mercato, informazione, regolamentazione, Il Mulino, Bologna, p. 442